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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our nation's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is always pointed at al qaeda and al qaeda-linked groups. because they view the attacks to have the fingerprints of that organization. it was extremely coordinated attack as you saw, more than 20 bombs, many car bombs and then for good measure they threw in some suicide bombers as well as sticky bombs on the bottoms of buses. most shi'a target and security targets. that sits in to what al qaeda is doing, try to destabilize the country by showing people its security forces can't protect them and trying to stir up the sectarian
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to see the world through palestinian eyes and challenged israeli and palestinian leaders to abandon formulas and habits that have blocked peace. but even amid his visit, the old threats and realities of violence were present. margaret warner reports from jerusalem. >> warner: the second day of the president's trip to israel and the west bank was met with rocket fire from one place mr. obama won't go: hamas-controlled gaza two landed in sderot, israel in a clear breach of the ceasefire between the islamist hamas faction and israel struck late last year. there were no injuries. a little-known militant group claimed responsibility, saying it wanted to show that israel could not protect its airspace during mr. obama's visit the israeli mayor of sderot said there was another message from militants to president obama: >> the message is "why you go to ramallah? we are the owners of this region. you can arrive to gaza and talk with us. why do you go to talk with abu mazen in ramallah?" >> warner: abu mazen is palesti
neil/lehrer productions >> brown: in jerusalem and the west bank today, president obama encouraged palestinians and israelis not to give up on peace. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> sreenivasan: and i'm hari sreenivasan. on the "newshour" tonight, rockets fired from gaza into israel today underscore the challenges to peace efforts. margaret warner has the latest from jerusalem. >> brown: then, as the house agrees to a measure to avoid a government shutdown, we update the short- and long-term budget battles. >> sreenivasan: paul solman looks at free trade through the eyes of a classic american brand, getting wet in the global market. >> i know that every surfboard that comes into america comes in duty free. and when i sell a surfboard to australia, japan, europe, its a 20% to 25% duty that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to t
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama told jordan's king abdullah he's worried that neighboring syria will become a haven for extremists and vowed to persuade congress to swnf jordan more money to shelter syrian refugees. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner is in amman and updates us on the president's middle east trip, capped by a breakthrough between two key u.s. allies. >> woodruff: then, we turn to chicago, where city officials announced plans to close 54 schools, most in overwhelmingly black neighborhoods. >> now we've got to worry about our kids going to another location. worry about what's going to happen to them going to school. >> brown: hari sreenivasan continues our series on broadband technology with a look at a new digital divide over how high-speed access and mobile devices are being used. >> woodruff: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provide
>> ifill: on the first foreign trip of his second term, president obama today reassured israelis of his commitment to the nation and renewed warnings to iran and syria. we begin our coverage with a report from margaret warner who is on the ground there. >> warner: it was all sunshine and smiles as the president arrived on a sparkling day outside tel aviv. his tense, occasionally stormy relationship with prime minister netanyahu momentarily set aside as he began his first presidential visit to israel. >> good to see you. it's wonderful to be here. >> warner: the apparent goodwill led to a moment of levity about a deadly-serious issue that tops the agenda here-- the u.s. and israel's differing views on how to confront iran's advancing nuclear program, and what should be the trigger for military action against it. >> you hear about red lines all the time, right? >> bibi's always talking about redlines. this is all a psychological ploy! >> this was minutely planned! >> warner: netanyahu famously set his redline for action against iran's progress toward a bomb at the u.n. last fall.
of "newsline." do stay with us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: president obama declared the u.s. is israel's strongest ally and greatest friend and saipeace in the middle east is still possible. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner is traveling with the president and briefs us on his first trip to israel as head of state. >> ifill: then, we examine the allegations that chemical weapons have been used in the syrian conflict. >> brown: judy woodruff updates the efforts to pass gun control legislation in congress and around the country. >> ifill: ray suarez talks to an emergency room doctor whose new book recounts his return home to work on the frontlines in inner city newark. >> we have an overflux of patients cong ito the emrgen deptmen andif you're using the ambulance system for a non-emergency issue, you are taking away from that person who's not able to breathe. now imagine that was your grandmother, imagine that was your father. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan begins a series of stories on th
of president obama's middle east trip saw an unexpected breakthrough on an issue that has hobbled u.s. efforts toñr contain the conflict in syria-- a long-simmering dispute between israel and turkey. on the ben gurion airport tarmac before leaving israel, the president facilitated an ice- breaking phonecall between israeli prime minister netanyahu and turkey's premier erdogan. despite shared concerns about the syrian conflict and other eruptions in the region, they haven't been speaking for nearly three years. mr. netanyahu apologized for the death of nine turkish activists during a 2010 israeli commando raid on an aid ship bound for blockaded gaza. it brought a sudden halt to what had been security cooperation between the two countries. today erdogan and netanyahu agreed to normalize relations again. the president spoke of the call and that relationship's importance this evening in amman jordan >> fortunately, they were able to begin the process of rebuilding normal relations between two very important countries in the region. you know, this is a work in progress. it's just beginning. as i s
problems have proved intractable. at the same time, president obama's trip to the middle east last week hassles put new focus on trying to restart the israeli-palestinian peace process. the trip through the region has provided kerry with a first-hand introduction to a daunting agenda and it is likely to be only the first of many such trips to come. for more on the challenges ahead for secretary of state for more on the challenges ahead for secretary of state kerry, i'm joined by michele dunne, formerly with the national security council and state department. she now heads the middle east program at the atlantic council. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in ira
similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizona law. and today's arguments on the heels of another case that could roll back a key portion of the voting rights act of 1965. for more on today's arguments, we turn as always to marcia coyle of the "national law journal." she was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. so the outcome, marcia, of this could actually tip the federal-state balance on who gets to govern how we vote. >> that's true, gwen. the question before the justices is where do you draw the line between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other does? so that's the issue before the court. it wasn't clear today that it's going to be an easy line to find. >> ifill: the reason why this arizona law exists is because arizona officials say there's a problem involving illegal or undocumented immigrants register
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)